Friday, March 12, 2021

A TINY FLOWER, FIRST ONE I HAVE NOTICED GROWING WILD THIS YEAR.

We were on one of our walks.  The temperature was lovely and warm, with a gentle breeze, not the biting wind that we have been having lately.  The day was glorious and we were able to put our winter coat away for a while.  This little blue flower was everywhere we walked.  I will have more photos of where we went next Tuesday, but I will share these today.  On our way up the hill I looked down at my feet.  The little blue flowers were everywhere.

They are called Birdeye speedwell, a species of Speedwells (Veronica).  It is also known as Persian speedwell, Common field speedwell, Creeping speedwell and Winter speedwell.  Its botanical name is Veronica persica.

Birdeye speedwell produces a pretty blue flower with a white center, and the small blue flowers are often regarded as speedwell.  The middle part of the flower seem like a bird's eye.  

It is native to Eurasia but has been introduced to many parts of the world.  Generally considered to be a weed, it was historically used to treat heart trouble by Afghani herbalist Mahomet Allum. It was also used to clear sinus infections, ease eye soreness and to help eyesight.  It also helps relieve muscle soreness, easing tension in the body according to what I read on my plant app.  Obviously I wouldn't recommend any of these applications as I am far from being an expert and don't really know how it would affect people or do harm, but it might be of interest from an historical point of view.  There was a warning which read, complete with capitals: "Content feedback CANNOT be used as any basis for EATING ANY PLANTS.  Some plants can be VERY POISONOUS, and it is recommended to purchase edible plants through regular channels."  So now we know!
I found a very nice poem:

"The speedwell and daisies are blooming together
They're blending as one in the hues of the morn,
I'll follow the thread through the land they are weaving,
And casting their spell as the new day is born.
Like the blue of the sky and the white golden sunshine
They rise from the green on this bright summer's morn,
Wherever they shine I'll be happy to wander
For I'll never tire of their wondrous display."

~Author, Andrew Blakemore~

I enjoyed that Mr. Blakemore, thank you!


And I hope you have enjoyed this post.
Have a great weekend!  See you on Monday.





 

36 comments:

  1. What a pretty, pretty plant. Thank you. And yes, care needs to be taken before ingesting any 'natural' find.

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  2. Hello Denise,

    They are pretty flowers, thanks for sharing the info and poem. Take care! Have a great day and a happy weekend!

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    1. Thanks Eileen, and you are very welcome. I wish you the same :)

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  3. Beautiful flowers and beautiful poem!

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  4. I don't have any of your beautiful blue flowers that are good for sore muscles so I am laying on a grave heating pad plugged into the wall hahaha. Having back problems today for no reason that I can think of

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    1. Hi Sandra, and oh dear! Hope all your aches and pains feel better soon :)

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  5. Our first native blue flowers are the violets.

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    1. Interesting Red. We have violets here also but not in this area apparently. Whether they have started to bloom yet I don't know :)

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  6. Such lovely little speedwells, Denise. We've seen these on our walks, but I didn't know their names. I have veronica speedwell growing in my perennial bed, but it is a different variety and they are not blooming yet, but soon.

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    1. How lovely Martha Ellen, these would be very pretty in a perennial bed as would the Veronica. I am looking forward to everything blooming again. I'm sure you are too :)

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  7. Lovely poem, hard to thing of these as weeds.

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  8. What sweet flowers those are. Glad you spotted them.

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  9. They make a beautiful carpet and no doubt enliven the spirits of all who see them - but don't eat them!

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  10. We have had wild flowers for over a month and yes, masses of speedwell. Have a good Sunday Diane

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    1. That's wonderful! You have a good Sunday too Diane :)

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  11. they are perfectly lovely little flowers, the foliage is beautiful as well!! funny how wild flowers grow, without any "interference" from us humans...

    such a sweet poem as well!!

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    1. So glad you enjoyed the poem Debbie :) Perfect indeed and wildflowers are indomitable!

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  12. They are pretty flowers, a nice colour.
    I enjoyed the poem, thank you.

    Have a lovely weekend.

    All the best Jan

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    1. You are very welcome Jan and all the best to you too :)

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  13. Denise, we used to have so many of those birdseye speedwell blooms on our lawn at the VA house. They were a welcome sign of spring coming, which isn't happening here in NH anytime soon.

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    1. That's interesting Dorothy, I don't think I have seen them before, or maybe never noticed them more to the point. I do remember seeing a lot of wild violets around and am happy to add the Speedwell to my list from now on :)

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  14. I've never heard of or seen a speedwell, but how pretty they are. Your photos are gorgeous and I love the poem too. I wonder if I've seen them but just didn't know their name.

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    1. Thank you Kay, I think your last sentence applies to me :)

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