Saturday, May 21, 2022

‘HOPE IS THE THING WITH FEATHERS' BY EMILY DICKINSON

 


Hope is the thing with feathers 

That perches in the soul, 

And sings the tune without the words

And never stops at all,


And sweetest in the gale is heard;

And sore must be the storm

That could abash the little bird

That kept so many warm.


I've heard in the chillest land,

And on the strangest sea;

Yet, never, in extremity,

It asked a crumb of me.



“Emily Dickinson's poem was published in 1861.  She spent most of her adult life as a recluse living in her family home, only rarely venturing out.  She was very quiet and timid, never married or actively sought a permanent relationship, despite correspondence with several older men she viewed as her protectors.

Her poetry is full of figurative language, and this poem is an extended metaphore, transforming hope into a bird (the poet loved birds) that is ever present in the human soul.  It sings, especially when times get tough.  Hope springs eternal, might be a reasonable summing up.”









I recently found this in my drafts and must have been in the middle of putting it together (a poem I have read many times over the years, as many of us have no doubt).  I don’t remember where this information came from, as it is one of those where I was probably distracted and forgot to make note of the link.  And then I forgot I was in the middle of posting it, and didn't - smiling here.   She is one of my favorite poets. 



35 comments:

  1. She Is a wonderful poet! And I know this beautiful poem, but I have only read the first verse. So this is a real treat.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So glad Ginny, I don't often get to see the full poem either :)

      Delete
  2. A very lovely poem. I believe that hope is both fragile and essential.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Sweet refrain are her words! Just like birdsong. Interesting to read of her life in a Reader's Digest condensed form too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Anni :) I always like to read a bio and always very interesting.

      Delete
  4. Hello,
    A beautiful poem, thanks for sharing. Take care, have a great weekend.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I first heard of this poem quite a few years back. I had made a wall hanging with birds on it and asked my blog pals for suggestions on what wording to add to it. One of my readers suggested the line "Hope is the thing with feathers"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. How lovely Ann and that is one of my favorite quotes :)

      Delete
  6. Replies
    1. Estou feliz que você tenha gostado. Muito obrigado! Um abraço e continuação de boa semana :)

      Delete
  7. This poem is inspiring even comforting

    ReplyDelete
  8. I am famous for not 'getting' poems. this is one of the ones I don't get and no matter how many times i read it still do not.. to me hope is the thing with feathers is just nonsense.. I am in the minority though. just from reading this post, she must have been a very sad person to live like she did. I just looked up and saw Christines the poem is inspiring even comforting. I just do not get it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Understand Sandra :) I do wonder what her life would have been like being such a recluse. Perhaps she was at peace with it. I do hope so.

      Delete
  9. As one who admittedly has not read very many of Ms Dickinson's poems, except for school reading assignments, I appreciated this post with more information and the lovely poem, Denise.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Dorothy :) so glad you enjoyed my post and thank you.

      Delete
  10. You were probably thinking about the poem and what Dickinson was saying and then you forgot to post it. For me, you could use more of Dickinson's poetry.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will do that Red, especially knowing that you are a fan. I do love her writings. Thank you!

      Delete
  11. I've always loved this poem!
    (ツ) from Cottage Country Ontario , ON, Canada!

    ReplyDelete
  12. I have always loved that poem. She was quite wonderful.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Much of what she wrote is still relatable.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Brilliant writer. She found the exact and perfect way to illustrate mercurial sustainable hope that is forever there. I wonder which of her hopes were or perhaps not realized.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope she had many hopes realized. Thank you Penelope :)

      Delete
  15. HOPE is one of my favorite words, Denise. That's nice that you know a bit about the poet. I love poetry as well.

    Have a peaceful Sunday, and a splendid week ahead.

    ~Sheri

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Denise, I'm glad you enjoyed Nel's fairy garden. It was a labor of love. Thanks for stopping by to see it. They have so many cute fairy items out there at the craft stores and such, and sometimes if I see one that I like, I'll pick one up just for me. ; )

      Delete
    2. Hi Sheri, I did so enjoy Nel's fairy garden and appreciated the link. How lovely that you treat yourself. Perhaps I should buy a few pieces too :) And HOPE is a wonderful word, I agree. Thank you :) You have a wonderful rest of the week, and a great weekend!

      Delete

I thank you for taking the time to leave a comment. I enjoy reading them very much and always try to return a visit. As I do monitor comments it may take a while for them to appear, even quite late depending on what is going on and how much time I am able to spend on the computer.

I appreciate all who look at my blog, but I am unable to publish businesses or anonymous visitors.