Monday, March 7, 2022

MONDAY RECIPE POST - OATMEAL COOKIES


I have tried several oatmeal cookies over time, and enjoy trying different versions.  This one has molasses added and that intrigued me. My Dear Other Half enjoys it, as did my Mother-in-Law.  I never got the hang of her bread doughnuts, which were exceptional.  It has been years since I tried making those, and I should make another effort. A tablespoon of molasses was always added on the side for dipping, right next to those doughnuts, which were swoon-worthy! 

Anyhow, getting back to these cookies, a tablespoon of molasses is one of the ingredients and the reason I decided on using this recipe.  I found it at Sally’s Baking Recipes here.  I always recommend looking at the original for many reasons, all her tips were very useful and a great guideline.  She describes them as having “a chewy texture, soft centers, plump raisins, and cinnamon flavor”.  

Gregg was out of the house for a few hours, and I decided to make this version of his favorite cookie, with a nod to his Mom, whose bread doughnuts were always an incredible treat on our visits back in the day.  Her use of Molasses and my use of it today  were the connecting dots between memories.


Soft and Chewy Oatmeal Raisin Cookies 

Makes 26 to 30 cookies

https://sallysbakingaddiction.com/soft-chewy-oatmeal-raisin-cookies/


1 cup (230g) unsalted butter, softened to room temperature

1 cup (200g) packed light or dark brown sugar

1/4 cup (50g) granulated sugar

2 large eggs*

1 tablespoon  pure vanilla extract

1 tablespoon molasses

1-1/2 cups (188g) all-purpose flour (spoon & leveled)

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 and 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon salt

3 cups (240g) old-fashioned whole rolled oats*

1 cup (140g) raisins

optional: 1/2 cup (64g) chopped toasted walnuts


Using a hand mixer or a stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment, cream the softened butter and both sugars together on medium speed until smooth, about 2 minutes. Add the eggs and mix on high until combined, about 1 minute. Scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl as needed. Add the vanilla and molasses and mix on high until combined. Set aside.

In a separate bowl, whisk the flour, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt together. Add to the wet ingredients and mix on low until combined. Beat in the oats, raisins, and walnuts (if using) on low speed. Dough will be thick, yet very sticky. Chill the dough for 30-60 minutes in the refrigerator (do the full hour if you’re afraid of the cookies spreading too much). If chilling for longer (up to 2 days), allow to sit at room temperature for at least 30 minutes before rolling and baking.

Preheat oven to 350°F (177°C). Line two large baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats. Set aside.

Roll balls of dough (about 2 tablespoons of dough per cookie) and place 2 inches apart on the baking sheets. I recommend using a cookie scoop since the dough can be sticky. Bake for 12-14 minutes until lightly browned on the sides. The centers will look very soft and under-baked. Remove from the oven and let cool on baking sheet for 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely. The cookies will continue to “set” on the baking sheet during this time.


Sally’s Notes:


“Make Ahead and Freezing 

Cookies stay fresh covered at room temperature for up to 1 week. Baked cookies freeze well – up to three months. Unbaked cookie dough balls freeze well – up to three months. Bake frozen cookie dough balls for an extra minute, no need to thaw. 


Oats: For these oatmeal raisin cookies, I use old-fashioned whole oats. They provide the ultimate hearty, chewy, thick texture we love!


Eggs: Room temperature eggs preferred. Good rule of thumb: always use room temperature eggs when using room temperature butter.


Raisins: Soak your raisins in warm water for 10 minutes before using (blot very well to dry them) – this makes them nice and plump for your cookies.


Oatmeal Raisin Cookie Dough is Sticky

This oatmeal raisin cookie dough is sticky, so don’t be alarmed. The cookie dough needs to chill for about 30 minutes before baking. I don’t recommend keeping this cookie dough in the refrigerator for much longer because your cookies won’t spread. The oats will begin to absorb all of the wonderful moisture from the eggs, butter, and sugar and won’t expand as they bake. Sticky dough is good dough!”



What did we think?  

They were a big hit and snapped up when offered, with more requested.  We definitely liked the texture and the taste of this oatmeal cookie.   I had a thought that if in a rush to go out in the morning, a couple of these would suffice in a pinch, to replace breakfast.   

My brown sugar was rock hard!  I had to put it into the blender to break it up.  Anyone have any better ideas for that?  

I included the walnuts and left them in quite big pieces.  Next time I will add more, a handful or so. 

The molasses was a big hit, not overpowering by any means.  I'll definitely keep that in the recipe.

One of the commenters I read said they added dried cranberries instead of raisins.  I also thought dried chopped dates might be nice for a change.  However, Sweet Other Half enjoyed these cookies so much, he doesn't want me to change a thing and that's great.  I'm glad he enjoyed them.  

I always raise the temperature in our oven, because it seems to run on the cooler side.  I end up cooking longer than a recipe requires.  Instead of 350 I put it up to 375, and they came out great.   That's just for our oven mind you, yours might be spot on.

I think that's about it.  If there is anything else that comes to mind, I will add later.


Thanks for looking and have a great week.








39 comments:

  1. I can almost smell them and feel the texture now!

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  2. Replies
    1. That means a lot to me, thank you so much Ginny :)

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  3. Oh yum!!!
    As for my brown sugar, I buy the sugar that is bagged (plastic). When opened & stored I wrap it in a zip lock bag, then place the double wrapped sugar in a tightly sealed plastic container. It doesn't harden.

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  4. Looks so good, with the descriptions of chewy texture and plumps raisins are tempting and appetizing. Have a great week.

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    1. Very happy you like these babYpose :) Thank you and you have a great week also :)

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  5. Hello Denise,
    Your cookies look and sound delicious. Thanks for sharing the recipe.
    Take care, enjoy your new week!

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    Replies
    1. You are very welcome and thank you Eileen :) You take care and enjoy your new week also!

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  6. The look delicious. I'm intrigued by bread donuts.

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    1. M-in-L used to use frozen bread dough from the store. She would pinch pieces off and work them into a large ring, making the hole without breaking the dough. Then she would fry them in deep oil. I used to see her wave her hand over that oil to check on its temperature. Not close to the surface but inches above. The dough also had to be risen overnight, as you would normally. Powdered sugar sprinkled on top of the cooked one, with that molasses on the side. Sounds simple enough but I could never quite get it right and it was my nemesis, lol!

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  7. Healthy and yummy!

    I can almost smell them too!

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    Replies
    1. It is a wonderful aroma :) Thank you Veronica Lee :)

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  8. These sound so delicious! You can soften brown sugar by putting it in a bowl covered with a damp paper towel and microwave for 15 second increments, breaking it up in between as you go. Just have to be careful not to let it start melting.

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    1. Thank you Martha, and also for the great tip :)

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  9. I'm glad you have the info on how they should look when they are ready to come out of the oven. I like my cookies soft -- but done! These sound very good -- I may have to give them a try.

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    1. Thanks Jeanie, I am probably a little too detailed at times, but I need these reminders for when I make them again :)

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  10. Bet they are delightful! And bet my husband would love them. :-)

    Really should bake his cookies. Instead of buying them.

    I say "his" cookies, because I have to eat Gluten Free.

    But knowing what went into any item, is the preferred way. Mmmm, not the easiest but the best. :-)

    πŸŒΈπŸ‡πŸŒΈ

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    1. Thank you, they are very good. I have been thinking of making them gluten-free just to try. I have the store-bought cookies at times, my favorites are Pepperidge Farm's Taho and Milano. Gregg isn't one for chocolate chips but does enjoy all the others, especially Pecan Sandies. When I feel like spending more time in the kitchen, I will occasionally make them from scratch. We both enjoy them and they are his favorite.

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  11. And brown sugar... I always put a small "hunk" of bread, in the jar, with my brown sugar. It seems to 'soak up' humidity. And allows the sugar to stay soft. :-)

    πŸŒΈπŸ‡πŸŒΈ

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  12. microwaving the brown sugar may soften it I remember reading. I have molasses so thanks will try this. I also have cranberries, debating on whether to use that.

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    Replies
    1. Another great tip, thank you Christine. And I hope you enjoy the recipe.

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  13. These oatmeal cookies look wonderful! I love how you referenced connecting the dots of memories with them. It's funny how a food or similar one brings us back home. My Mama used to make oatmeal cookies from the recipe on the Quaker Oats round box.

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    1. Thanks Martha Ellen :) A nice memory of your Mama :) They are always with us.

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  14. They do look good.

    This article is an interesting read:
    Why Does Brown Sugar Dry Out and Harden and What Can I Do About It?

    https://culinarylore.com/food-science:why-does-brown-sugar-dry-out-and-harden/

    All the best Jan

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  15. Oh, your oatmeal raisin cookies look Yummy, Denise. One of my favorites for sure. My father-in-law made the BEST oatmeal raisin cookies, and I haven't been able to make them as good as him all these years. I think the molasses adds something extra.

    ~Sheri

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    Replies
    1. It makes me happy you think so Sheri :) How sweet remembering your father-in-law's oatmeal raisin cookies, that must be a lovely memory.

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  16. I bet Roger would like these.

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  17. Ahhhhh, I was right! I have commented here recently!

    And put your blog, on my Blog List. Or thought so.

    But it does not show up. -sigh-

    So, I will try again. -smile-

    🚫Stop Time Change🚫

    ReplyDelete

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