Thursday, May 26, 2022

MEADOWLARK GARDEN WALK ON 5-5-22

I have just found a very nice photo of the Fairy Garden at this link.  I am not sure how long it will be there, but it will give you a better idea of its layout than the photos I took.  Mine were more close-ups, and you can find the post here if you missed it.
This is from our last walk at the garden in the beginning of May.  We know every square inch but still, we always see it as though for the first time.  It never gets tiring to visit this place.
Two birds, the American Robin and below a female Red-winged Blackbird.  You will see a small turtle if you go to the waterline and look to the left, before you get to those big leaves.  Enlarging the photos will help.
The same bird but a closer view of its profile.
I have always liked this bridge across the lake.  We are on the other side at the water's edge.  There is a bench so that you can sit and take it all in, and occasionally if you are very quiet (we chat a lot), a bird will come and rest on the branches of the trees each side.
It is the first time I have noticed fish nests below the surface.  I knew immediately what they were. Years ago we were at another pond and as we stared at a similar scene, a gentleman, who had been standing not too far away, told us exactly what they were.  (I did actually see smaller fish circling inside the nests then and now) I haven't seen these nests since, but then I haven't been looking and wonder if it's only at this time of the year?  I couldn't find much information on line. There are a lot of koi in the lake, quite big ones.  I didn't see them but they will be showing themselves soon.  I found the following information here, as I was curious about what happens to them in the wintertime.  It says, "You'll know when your fish go dormant. They won't lie down on the pond's bottom or curl up in their cozy Koi Kastle (yes you can actually buy a Koi Kastle at this link), but they will float upright, tuck in their fins and remain suspended in the water. As the fish hover there, you may still see some super slow movement, and they may also wind up facing in the same direction as if they were heading somewhere at less than a snail's speed." 
 Our guesses included carp but there was no knowledgeable gentleman around this time.  I found info here.  It says Koi are actually descendants of carp.  I am including an except which I found interesting.  "Carp spawn in late May or early June and display unique spawning habits. They thrash and wiggle their way into very shallow, weedy areas, sometimes so shallow that their bodies are completely exposed. Instead of building nests or caring for their young, carp broadcast their eggs. A 20-pound female carp will lay nearly 10 million eggs, though very few survive. Eggs hatch in 2-8 days, depending on water temperature, and the young quickly disperse. Young carp are very susceptible to predation, but adults are too big to have non-human predators."  The difference between a koi and a carp can be found here, and is where I found my information about the koi being its descendant.   Okay, so all you who are fishing enthusiasts may know all this, but it was a learning experience for me.  I hasten to add there is no fishing allowed at the garden.
Phlox and Daylilies line one of the pathways.
In the photo below, right off center, you can see the Katsura tree (botanical name Cercidiphyllum japonicum), native to China and Japan.  There is a very good website I found  here, with more photos.  It is also called Katsura Vine and Weeping Katsura Tree.  
They grow no more than 45 feet and can live up to 60 years.  Male trees will produce red flowers, and female trees with produce green flowers.  Butterflies and bees are attracted to the blossoms.  It is a fast-growing tree that grows best in full sunlight to partial shade.  It prefers rich soil, but tolerates wet, clay or acidic soil.  There are two of these close together and we wondered after reading the above, what kind of flowers they will produce.
Interesting facts are that the Katsura tree is a low-maintenance ornamental tree that thrives in temperate regions.  The tree produces small and inconspicuous flowers, and is more well-known for its fall foliage fragrance of brown sugar.  I am getting all my information from my plant app, Picture This, which I have mentioned before.  I have it downloaded on my iPhone.  Most of the time if I feel like meandering, I take a photo of whatever I am interested in, and find out right there and then.  Other times I will wait until I get home,  and get the information in the evening when I am downloading my photos.  It's a beautiful tree, one that we have been enjoying for many years.

That's all for today's post.  I will be putting another together as we took a lot more photos, as is our way.
Thank you for looking and enjoy 
the rest of your week.




34 comments:

  1. It really is a beautiful place. I am not surprised you go back time and time again. I would too.

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  2. I can see why you never tire of walking in this place. Your photos and info are very good. Carp spoil our rivers. They are not native and they take over the rivers from the native species.

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    1. Thank you Diane :) what a shame about your Carp.

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  3. That tree is so gorgeous!!! Interesting about the fish/fish nests. I didn't know koi are related to carp. That mama bird is so well camouflaged!!!

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    1. Thank you Anni, I thought so too. And that was new to me also. She certainly is well camouflaged isn’t she? :)

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    1. Obrigada! Um abraço e desejo um feliz dia e fim de semana :)

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  5. Such a beautiful park. Some of these photos are so scenic and look so serene.

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    1. I agree Ann, I always feel so relaxed among these beautiful surroundings :) Thank you!

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  6. It is a beautiful place to visit, your photos are wonderful. Take care, enjoy your day!

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    1. Hi Eileen, thank you and I wish you the same :)

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  7. That's a beautiful and well cared garden! Those photos are lovely.

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    1. Thank you Angie :) I am happy you enjoyed my photos of the garden .

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  8. Escaping to nature and its beauty is good for the soul especially with the tragic news events of the past week, Denise. We also share your frustration with the lack of gun control measures in the US compared to many other countries. The only “shooting” that should be done is with a camera, not a weapon.

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    1. I agree with you totally on that Dorothy, and needing to get out a lot more lately. These places are so soul soothing, the only medicine I will take willingly :)

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  9. this place is beyond extraordinary! so much beauty to take in. i went to the link and you are right that photo is amazing. love the rusty sculptures too... your photos are as always fantastic and I would love to wander and know every inch of this place. do you have to pay to go in there? we have places like this but there is a cost. a high cost.

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    1. Thank you Sandra, so glad you see that, and also thank you for those sweet comments on my photos. Very much appreciated. I remember all the beautiful places in Florida I enjoyed when we last visited. I hope to go to them again one day. There fee is between $3.00 and $6.00. I believe we pay $3.00 for being at a certain age ;) We actually buy their yearly membership which also lets you bring in another person. It's one of the most reasonable parks I have ever been to. Of course, places like Huntley Meadows and Occoquan Bay and others, have no fees.

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  10. Oh, I'm so glad you have a peaceful place of nature to visit, Denise. What a wonderful photo of the Robin. I've been seeing them in my front yard a lot lately. This little bridge is so charming, and everything looks nice and green. The bridge photo really does look like a post card. The purple flowers are so pretty, and that's another exceptional photo with the purple flowers and the weeping tree in the distance. I wish I could visit here. I think I would stay for a long time just enjoying the nature around me. : )

    ~Sheri

    *your comments are coming through on my profile page, but they don't show up on the posts. Not sure why, but many blog friends are having issues with the comments lately. Just wanted you to know. Have a sweet day.

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    1. Hi Sheri, we are very fortunate with the places we can go to. None within walking distance for us but several within a short car ride. We have a lot of Robins around here also, always a welcome sight. So glad you enjoyed my photos, thank you. Blogger is acting a bit strange lately isn't it? I hope these glitches are sorted out soon. I keep having to get comments out of my spam folder from blogging friends!

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  11. Gorgeous! Yes I agree that these same places take on such different looks as the seasons change and progress. Phlox are one of my favorites - so beautiful and fragrant.

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    1. Hello Lauren, thank you very much! I wasn't able to visit you as there was no direct link, but just wanted you to know how much I appreciated your visit. Have a wonderful weekend :)

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    1. Thank you so much Anne, happy you enjoyed :)

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  13. Thank you for the link about the garden and parkland. I'm not surprised that you go there often as there's so much to see in every season of the year. I get a sense of the tranquility and yet the wildlife is active and must be fascinating to watch if you stand or sit for a while and observe what's going on.

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    1. You are very welcome Linda and thank you :) We have even been here when there has been snow on the ground and it's gorgeous! We do enjoy the wildlife :)

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    1. Thank you William, it is one of our favorite walks :)

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  15. Great post! I love the arched bridge over the pond. It reminds me of Monet’s bridge that he painted so often.

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    1. Thank you Linda :) Well, now you mention it Linda, the bridge could fit beautifully into a Monet painting :)

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  16. Beautiful place and lovely flowers/scenes/reflections too.

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