Friday, September 30, 2022

HOVERFLY ON TICKSEED


I was interested in the insect on this pretty yellow flower.  At first, I thought it was a bee but as I looked closer, its markings seemed to be different, and I then thought of the hoverfly.  Later I confirmed it. They have been described as a bee/wasp lookalike.  The adults are nectar and pollen feeders, and after bees, are the most important insect pollinators. 
Other facts: you can tell the difference between bees and hoverflies.  Bees have four wings and hoverflies have only two wings.  Hoverflies also don't have a stinger.  Good to know!  Some greenhouses breed hoverflies for use in pollinating peppers, or to help plants produce seeds for seed banks.  Hoverflies also love to feed on aphids.  They are found worldwide.  There are about 6,000 of its species throughout the world, and 900 are in North America.  Hoverflies are found on every continent except Antarctica.  

The flowers I found them on are the Tall tickseed, a species of Calliopsis.  Also known as Tickseed, Tall coreopsis and Atlantic coreopsis.  Its botanical name is Coreopsis tripteris.  It blooms in the summer and is a perennial herb.  Tickseed can be a tall plant and reaches up to 7 to 9 feet.  It spreads aggressively and likes a warm and dry climate but can tolerate occasional wet weather.  It grows best between 50 to 86 degrees Fahrenheit.  To attract birds you need to let the flowers go to seed as birds love them.



38 comments:

  1. Great shot of the hoverfly. I have at least two kinds of coreopsis in my yard and one kind is definitely tall.

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    1. Thank you Linda, those must look lovely in your garden :)

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  2. A gorgeous and informative post. Many thanks on both counts.

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    1. You are very welcome Sue and thank you! So glad you enjoyed this :)

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  3. Good shot and lovely photos Denise.

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  4. That's a great shot of the hoverfly, Denise. The flowers are very pretty too.

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    1. Hi Angie, thank you, very happy you enjoyed :)

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  5. Interesting facts on the hoverfly. I don't know that I have ever seen them before. Then again I may have and thought it was a bee.

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    1. I was the same Ann, they are the same coloring that can be confusing :)

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  6. The resemblance must fool a lot of predators.

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    1. Obrigada! Fico feliz que tenha gostado :) Um abraço e continuação de boa semana.

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  8. Love both the bees and the yellow flowers

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  9. I'm wondering if this is the plant we have! I love the hoverfly. Nice post.

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    1. Thank you Jenn, your flowers must look gorgeous. I was really taken with these.

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  10. That hoverfly photo is a gem -- beautifully done. Sometimes nature stages things better than we ever could! Those flowers are fabulous and now I've learned something new! Have a wonderful weekend!

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    1. Thank you Jeanie, I appreciate that :) and that is certainly true! You have a wonderful weekend also :)

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  11. I never paid attention before, now I will have to. A most interesting and educational narrative on the hoverfly.

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  12. I've heard of hover flies and now I know something about them.

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    1. Happy to pass my research onto my blogging friends Red, thank you :)

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  13. That is a good clear photo of the hoverfly and great info! All new to me. The bright and cheerful flowers were nice to see! Happy weekend to you.

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    1. Thank you Ellen, glad you enjoyed. Happy weekend to you also :)

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  14. I am not fond of bugs, but I do like the flowers.

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  15. Wow! Some lovely shots! Great post and great information...
    Love from Titti

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    1. Hello Titti, very happy you enjoyed. Love from me too :)

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  16. Very interesting facts about the difference between the bee and the hoverfly! Thank you for this education, Denise. Tickseed is so lovely and tempting to bring indoors, but it always has insects to persuade me to do otherwise. It's been quite prolific alongside the roads this summer. I enjoyed seeing your pretty photos of them!

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    1. I am very glad you found this interesting Martha Ellen and that you enjoyed. No, I wouldn't want to bring in insects into the house, that's for sure :) I love seeing them outside when driving around.

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  17. I have never heard of hoverflies before but, thanks to you, I learned about them. I discovered tickseed flowers this summer while taking care of a monarch waystation. Inaturalist taught me about them.

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    1. Thanks Yogi, I am always glad to pass on something new in my blog posts. I like the idea of taking care of a monarch waystation. Applauding here. I have heard nothing but good reports on Inaturalist.

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  18. At first glance, I would also have suspected that insect was a bee, so thanks, Denise, for the clarification and also the information. The tickseed flowers were lovely.

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    1. You are very welcome and so glad you enjoyed :)

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