Thursday, September 22, 2022

A FEW FLOWERS

I am sharing three flowers taken on our travels in August/September 2013.  When I took these original photos, at the time I was unable to identify the flowers that I took photos of, even though I tried.  Thanks to my app "Picture This" it has made it much easier to do that, and it has lots of good information.

Warty caltrop, a species of Kallstroemia, and also known as Small-flowered carpetweed
Warty caltrop is a low-growing ground cover with small golden flowers.  The plant's seeds are a common source of food for quail and dove.  The 'warty' part of its name, warty caltrop, refers to those seeds, which have tiny, potato-shaped protuberances, and are located near roads and railroads.  It is an herb and an annual that blooms in the Spring, Summer and Fall.  It grows from 1 to 2 feet and its flower is 0.4 of an inch.   There were two maps, one showing where it grows in the US, which includes Alaska in a separate part of the map bottom left...
and another shows the western tip of Alaska (top upper right), the Aleutian Islands.  The other country is the Philippines.  
I found this online also, a fun map of Alaska on wood.
The next purple flower is the Silverleaf nightshade, also known as Silver-leaved nightshade, Silverleaf nettle, Prairie berry, Silver nightshade, White horsenettle, Silver-leaf bitter-apple, Satansbos, Bull-nettle and Horsenettle.  Now those are a lot of names but let's not forget its botanical one, Solanum elaeagnifolium!  Silverleaf nightshade grows throughout the North and South Americas, and Africa.  In South Africa it is called "Satan's bush".  Ingestion of silverleaf nightshade is thought to be toxic to horses.  It can also be toxic to cattle and in severe cases, hallucinations, paralysis and death, yikes!  Compared to humans, the risk is higher for animals.  I won't go into any more details as it's not something that most would want to plant in their garden - at least to my mind.  Beautiful but deadly!
Next is Scarlet sage, a species of Sages (Salvia).  Also known as Bloody sage, Tropical sage, Scarlet salvia, Indian fire, Texas sage, Blood sage and Red Salvia.  Its botanical name is Salvia coccinea.  You will find it blooming at any time of the year.  It is a tropical wildflower and blooms in sandy soil in hot climates.  Butterflies and hummingbirds are drawn to it.  The flowers are each an inch long and tubular, providing a perfect fit for the hummingbirds to drink its nectar.  In addition to hummingbirds, goldfinches have been seen picking out the seeds from the scarlet sage blossoms.

Only three flowers to share with you, and I hope you have enjoyed them.  




32 comments:

  1. Interesting read and nice photos too Denise.

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  2. I did thoroughly enjoy this post. The sage is the only one I knew, but the others were definitely beautiful (albeit in one case dangerous) too.

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    1. That makes me happy, thank you Sue :) It's interesting what we find out about flowers isn't it?

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  3. Satan's bush looks beautiful, and its leaves look even a bit like sage...who wouldn't know those beauties are so deadly. Love that wood map of Alaska.

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  4. Great post and lovely flowers. The Scarlet Sage is pretty. Take care, have a happy day!

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  5. I just love all the apps that make identifying things so much easier. How did we ever get along without them all those years ago.

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    1. Me too, this is my favorite by far. I agree, how did we ever manage :) Very well my mother and grandmother would have said, but I suspect they would have been thrilled by this technology.

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  6. We have the salvia and nightshade all over my neck of the woods. I did NOT know how toxic the nightshade was tho.

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    1. Hi Anni, I think I might have come across the nightshade and found out how deadly it was in an Agatha Christie novel, if not something of that ilk :)

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  7. The salvia is pretty. Nightshades are worrisome plants.

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  8. AW, I love flowers and learning about diff ones. I love the purple the most but I just love purple.

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    1. That's great Pam, so glad :) Purple is a beautiful color.

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  9. What I enjoy is the information you provide about each plant.

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    1. And that makes me happy you enjoy Red :) Thank you!

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  10. Some beautiful and interesting plants you have shown us.

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  11. That scarlet sage is especially beautiful. I have nightshade growing wild in the garden, no matter how many times I pull it out!

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    1. Yes Jeanie, the sage is really beautiful :) I hope you get rid of your nightshade eventually. It's a pity as that's a pretty one too.

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  12. It's so nice how you can identify flowers of photos from the past. The wooden map of Alaska is especially nice, Denise.

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    1. Thank you Martha Ellen, my app really comes in useful :) That is a nice wooden map isn't it?

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    1. Thank you Christine, so glad you liked them :)

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  14. Those scarlet sage blossoms are lovely, what a beautiful colour.

    All the best Jan

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    1. It truly is, thank you Jan and all the best to you too ;)

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    1. I'm very happy you thought so William, thank you :) Flowers are a great source of joy to me.

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