Wednesday, November 10, 2021

MEADOWLARK GARDENS ON 10-27-21 - PART 3

The new-ish conservatory is taking shape.  There has been some planting in the surrounding flower beds... 
and the small flock of Canada Geese were nearby. 
This is one of the geese I noticed before with the deformed wings.  There are two of them.  I was very happy to see their family had not left them.  It looked like these two had had their misshaped wings surgically shortened by a veterinarian.  At least I think so as they weren't as noticeable as before.  Better for them for walking or swimming, and getting around generally.  I was happy they were getting the care they needed, these two.  Another flock of geese flew overhead just as I was taking this one's photo.  I looked up and they were a lovely sight, as any bird is in flight.  But when I saw this photo later on my laptop, I was a little sad that this poor goose, nor its sibling, would ever be able to join them, or ever fly themselves.  They are in a safe place, however, with plenty of space to roam in the garden, and I am thankful that those who run it are taking care of them.  I am also thankful that their goose family is sticking with them.
In the visitor center I saw a poster giving out information.  Good to see, as with people coming and going, maybe we can all get the word out how human food is so bad for wildlife.  It is not only the Canada Geese who can be affected.
Here are a small number of geese on the other lake, probably the ones we saw flying over our heads.  
They are using the drainage/filter for a resting spot.
These were gorgeous in the sunlight.  Can't quite get the right effect in these photos but I was really taken with them.  Called Chinese silver grass (botanical name Miscanthus sinensis), it is an herbaceous perennial grass that is slow in growth at a young age but can reach a mature height after two to three years from 3 to 7 feet.  
It also goes by the names Eulalia, Japanese silver grass, Eulalia grass, and Zebra grass.  It is native to eastern Asia throughout most of China, Japan, Taiwan and Korea.  It is used predominantly for feedstock production for both energy and non-energy end uses.

We are walking along the path and I'm noticing everything around me.  I want to get more information on the trees I pass, and on doing some research I found out these were from the White Oak. Its botanical name is Quercus alba and common names are Eastern white oak and Stave oak. 
Although it is called white oak, it is very unusual to find any tree with white tree bark.  The usual color for the tree bark is actually light gray.  The plant is called white oak because the name comes from the color processed wood which is white.  It is a slow-growing tree that grows only 1 foot to 1-1/2 foot per year.  It can live from 200 to 300 years, and even older trees have been found.
Native to eastern and central North America and found from Minnesota, Ontario, Quebec, and southern Maine south as far as northern Florida and eastern Texas.
Next is the Bottle gentian, a perennial, (botanical name Gentiana andrewsii).  Also known as Closed bottle gentian, Closed gentian and Blind gentian.  It gets its common name from the shape of its blooms.  These late-season flowers are mostly pollinated by bumblebees, the only insect with enough strength to pry open their buds. It is native to northeastern North America.

I took many photos in the garden and there will be two more posts to share. Thank you for following along, and I hope your day is a great one.








34 comments:

  1. The White Oak leaves are enormous, strange, and beautiful!! The ducks and geese at our local duckpond...some of them have died and many got sick from humans feeding them. The white bread caused their bones to have holes in them.

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    1. Isn't that just so very sad Ginny? Even more reason not to give wildlife human food.

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  2. I am so glad that those geese are safe, but worry about the others that our carelessness has put in danger.

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    1. Me too! Yes, we need to let people know and hopefully we can change their habits of feeding our wildlife. If we can reach one person, fantastic but more would be even more so.

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  3. I knew it was bad to feed them, but not the consequences of doing so.

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    1. I had never seen this syndrome before though I have known for quit a while, like you, that it was bad for them.

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  4. Hello Dennise, Lovely photos in the Meadow lark Gardens. All the tall trees, the swaying white Eulalia Grass is so beautiful, and the little blue flower the Bottle genitan, is pretty. The white grasses and blue flower have so many names, Two would be enough, the common and scientific, don't you agree!! I admire the research you do, but it would make life so much easier for these plants to have fewer names.Ha Ha!:=)

    It's good to know that he geese have settled in this beautiful scenic habitat, and your photos are delightful. I can imagine that if you were seated on those benches outside the new conservatory you would get a fantastic overall view of the beautiful surroundings. I hope the sign asking visitors not to feed the geese is observed with
    care, so that the geese live long and healthy lives, and even though one can't fly it can swim in lake/ pond and eat what nature intended.

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    1. Thank you Breathtaking. I have always been a very detailed person, that's why I like to include all names. Even more so for the scientific names as these are recognized all around the world. We might have different names for the flowers which are not the same in other countries. And, I like to have the reminder myself when I go back and read my posts. For me it is a refresher course and it's all in the detail, ha, ha!

      It makes me happy also that these geese have a wonderful place to live. I hope that sign works also.

      You're correct, the seats outside the conservatory will provide an amazing view.

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  5. I've never heard of angel wing syndrome. Interesting and sad

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    1. I had never heard of it either until the previous trip to the park and I saw those poor geese.

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  6. I'm glad the water birds are being looked after. I noticed the swans in one of my recent blog posts were feeding on scraps of bread that someone had left on the river bank and know that it's not advisable. On a happier note I did see squirrels in the park being fed with natural nuts in shells by a young lad and had to smile as the right kind of food is much better for wild creatures.

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    1. Thank you Linda :) Yes we need to think on what is the right food for our wildlife. And they provide so much pleasure.

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  7. those poor sweet geese touched my heart.. so glad someone is caring for them. i once told someone that bread is bad for birds and all fowls and was told they did not see how it could harm them and they conintued to feed the ducks and geese bread. bread is not good for any animal. people food can harm all wild life. in fact people harm the wildlife every day. very sad.. this place is just full of so much beauty

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    1. I have met people who feed human food to wildlife. They think they are being kind and don't realize it's actually being cruel as they don't know how harmful it actually is. Some people just won't listen anyway. Thanks for trying Sandra :)

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  8. Nice to see those geese. We don't see them here in Hawaii. Love the foliage over there.

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    1. I love the foliage over your way too Gigi :) Glad you enjoyed seeing our geese.

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  9. Fortunately, damaged birds are taken care of. Beautiful hay.

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    1. Yes I agree, very fortunate. Thank you Anne :)

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  10. Beautiful area.
    Such a great piece of education on the angel wing syndrome!!!

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    1. Thank you Anni, I keep trying to get the word out :)

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  11. That conservatory is gorgeous, Denise! I'm so glad you have brought to our attention on Angel Wing---so sad. Unfortunately I remember as a child going to the park to feed the ducks bread that we brought from home. My family loved animals and we would have never harmed them if we knew.

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    1. Thank you Martha Ellen, and I remember the days when I was a little girl of us feeding the birds bread. It was very much part of our Sunday drives in the country. It was delightful to see all the birds swimming towards us and we were happy in our not knowing. We also loved animals and it would have been the same for us :) Now the information is out there and we think twice.

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  12. Thank you for sharing the information about angel wing syndrome.

    All the best Jan

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    1. You are very welcome Jan, doing my small part to get the word out.

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  13. How lovely to see the geese and all your photos.
    The colours are good and pleasing to the eye Denise.

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  14. People just love feeding wildlife! They even feed bears, which is the height of foolishness. Well, continue to educate. Someone may learn from it.

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    1. That we do Linda and I agree about the bears. I hope I can reach people with this information.

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  15. Oh, I don't know that high carbohydrate can cause problems to geese or wild birds....
    Thank you for sharing the knowledge....

    # Have a wonderful day

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    1. You are very welcome Tanza, and you have a wonderful day also :)

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  16. This really is the loveliest garden, Denise. I'm so glad you are sharing it with us -- especially as all gardens here are long gone!

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    1. Hi Jeanie, thank you, glad you enjoyed. Yes, all the flowers will be gone and having their winter nap :)

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