Tuesday, September 14, 2021

MORE OF SKYLINE DRIVE - COMMON MILKWEED

I saw the Common Milkweed plant growing everywhere.  Later we parked next to Big Meadows and I had a chance to take photos.  The one below has leaves that are practically untouched, not too long out of the ground.  The botanical name is Asclepias syriaca and its other names are Silkweed, Butterfly flower and Silky swallowort.  The pods when they ripen will crack open.  Its seeds are white and fluffy, and will flutter like dandelions in the wind.A perennial, there are over 100 milkweed species that are native to North America, and it is the only food that Monarch caterpillars can eat. The monarch migration occurs twice every year. Nectar from flowers provides the fuel source monarchs need to fly. If there are not any blooming plants to collect nectar from when the monarchs stop, they will not have any energy to continue. 

Planting monarch flowers that bloom when when they are on their journey will help the monarchs reach their destination. Creating more monarch habitat will help work to reverse their decline.

However, the Milkweed is a toxic plant, which you can read about at this link.  Forewarned is forearmed!
I often wonder about the first settlers here.  I am sure they must have experimented on eating various plants they found to survive.  
There are many plants and flowers that we have to be careful with.  There are pros and cons to all things I suppose.
When they saw me taking photos, the couple in the photo above spoke to me for a few minutes.  They were very nice.  The gentleman was carrying his own camera.  I was curious where they were off to, because they were heading along the path with purpose. 
Other like-minded enthusiasts are good at finding great photo opportunities, and have often pointed me in the right direction.  Today was not the day to stay long.  Gregg was back at the car double-parked as the lot was full.  It would have been difficult for people to get around him, but he insisted I take my photos.  
A warning sign for dog owners.  On the other side there was information about ticks.  Having had one particular experience with them several years ago, the thought of them still give me the shivers.  But we left each other alone on this trip!

I have lots of photos from Big Meadows, and will share them next time.

Thanks for looking, and I hope your day is a great one.



38 comments:

  1. What a weird looking plant! I have never seen real Milkweed.

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    1. It is growing in a lot of our local gardens here Ginny. I'm always interested in the different stages, and also the bees and butterflies it attracts :)

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  2. There are some amazing plants in this world whether they are weeds or not.

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  3. I've never seen a sign like that before. Clever and that is a good reason to keep a pet leashed.

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    1. It is indeed:) I have come across people over the years whose dogs have had run ins with a skunk.

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  4. Hello,
    The butterflies will love all the milkweed plants. Hubby and I have often walked on the little trails on the Big Meadows and down the gravel road many times. Take care, have a happy day!

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    1. They certainly do :) I remember your posts from Big Meadows Eileen, and have enjoyed them very much. Thank you, and take care and have a happy day also.

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  5. I bet the meadow was pretty...looking forward to photos. I don't like ticks. I've had several from my walks (and rarely go back to those areas).

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    1. Thank you Anni :) and probably one of the things in nature that I am not fond of are those ticks.

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  6. Ticks? Shudder. I have avoided them, but a family friend nearly died after his encounter with one.
    Hooray for planting milkweed to feed the Monarch butterflies.

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    1. Shudder, shudder, shudder, lol! That's scary about your friend Sue. I know they carry Lime Disease and wonder if that's what your family friend had. I echo your sentiments on the milkweed :)

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    1. Obrigado pelo seu comentário gentil. Um abraço e uma boa semana contínua :)

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  8. Butterflies need all the help they can get.

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  9. I am with Jenny and the fact that I have never seen milkweed or if I did I didn't know it at the time. Sometimes it looks like it might be going to eat something there's one photo that made me think that. I know the monarchs appreciate it! I need to go out and take some pictures maybe when the weather cools off

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    1. Hi Sandra, I am note sure if milkweed grows that far south. I will have to do more research. The days seem to be getter cooler, though it is in the 80s here today. Thank you, hope things continue in the right direction for you :)

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  10. Ciekawy tekst o nieznanej mi roślinie. Dobre fotografie. Miłego tygodnia:)

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    1. Cieszę się, że uznałeś to za interesujące. Dziękuję Ci :)

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  11. Hello Denise,

    A super extension to your previous Skyline post. I personally have never seen Milkweed it certainly does not sound a friendly plant but good it helps the Monarch caterpillars
    My best wishes,
    John

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    1. Hello John, thank you very much. I am thinking of planting them in my garden specifically to help the monarchs, but would have to find out more as we have several animals in the area, pets and wildlife. As we have no fencing I wouldn't want to harm any of them. I think the wildlife know not to touch them though, including birds.

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  12. Interesting about the milkweed being poisonous except to the Monarchs.

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    1. Glad you found it interesting Christine, thank you :)

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  13. An interesting post about the Milkweed in your area. I often wonder about the first
    settlers in my area too. Our town is named after the first settler, so I would like to find out more.

    Have a good September week, Denise.

    ~Sheri

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    1. Thank you Sheri :) That would be interesting to find out about your town’s first settler. You have a good September week also.

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  14. I didn't realize that's what milkweed looks like. I don't see any butterflies in your pictures though. Is that because it's no longer the season for them?

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    1. No, I didn’t see any butterflies around, maybe past their season as you suggested. Their blooms have also come and gone. I didn’t see any caterpillars either. I have to find out more about their habits. Thanks for asking :)

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  15. the milkweed I've seen here in central Florida didn't look like that but similar and had lovely flowers butterflies love

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    1. That’s very interesting Carol. I must do a search for Florida milkweed.

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  16. Always a pleasure D! Greg is sweet.

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  17. I enjoyed this interesting post about the milkweed - a plant I haven't seen before in my part of the world.

    Happy Wednesday, Denise.

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    1. So happy you enjoyed Veronica :) Thank you! I hope your Wednesday is a happy one also.

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  18. I love the milkweed. Our haven't gone to seed yet, but soon!

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    1. I expect the next time I go out they will be too :)

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  19. There are several milkweeds out at the strip pit area, but still not as many as there used to be. When I was a kid, they seemed to grow everywhere.

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    1. They were everywhere along our drive. Good to see :)

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