Tuesday, January 12, 2021

PHOTOS OF BIRDS IN THE OUTERBANKS

 Thank you for the correct ID of these swans Eileen, very much appreciated.  The differences between the Tundra Swan and the Trumpeter Swan can be found here.  The Tundra swan has a little yellow on their beak whereas the Trumpeter does not.  


I am starting off with more photos from my sister-in-law today, starting off with the Tundra Swan.

I am not sure if I am correct in my ID here.  At first I thought they might have been a Redhead, but then I saw the Canvasback which is similar.  If you know for sure I would be grateful for the correction.


In this photo they are joined by the American Coot.

I wondered if the above bird was a female Ruddy Duck, with a closer look below.
This was the closest I came to a possible ID here, and please let me know if you think I am incorrect.  
Added note: please read Eileen's comment about these ducks.  Thanks again Eileen!
One of my favorite photos my sister-in-law took, a Hooded Merganser.
A beautiful photo of a Snow Goose in flight, and several more...
and a whole lot more.
An American Coot.


Two photos of the same bird, one a little closer.  You will recognize the Great Blue Heron

I have a number of other photos to share but will leave you with these for now.  With thanks again to my sister-in-law who lets me share them you.







28 comments:

  1. The Redheads look very similar to the male Shovelers, as well. This post has a great variety!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am still wondering if I have my identification wrong. Thanks Ginny, I will take a look at some male shovelers :)

      Delete
  2. Very nice photos! Have a good week.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hello,
    I am surprised to see the Trumpeter Swans in the Outerbanks. Usually the Tundra Swans are seen on the East Coast. The Redheads are pretty, they have a different bill than the Canvasback. The female American Black Duck looks a lot like your Ruddy Duck photo. Love the Snow Geese and Herons. Great collection of photos. Take care, enjoy your day and have a great week ahead.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for all the help with these ID's Eileen. I have since corrected the Tundra swan in the first collage. I read there has only been one sighting of a Trumpeter swan in that area, and that is a very rare event.

      Delete
  4. that coot is really cute.. all are wonderful. i have not seen a wild swan, only in captivity

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Isn't he thought? Thanks Sandra, it's very rare for me to see a wild swan one too.

      Delete
  5. Snow goose migration is spectacular.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Have you seen them Red? I would love to experience that one day :)

      Delete
  6. All the photos are spectacular, amazing birds. My favorite is the last one of the Great Blue Heron, it's fantastic.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much Maria, very happy you enjoyed my sister-in-law's photos :)

      Delete
  7. Hello Denise, Your sister-in-law is a good photographer. Really enjoyed looking at all the different birds. The close up of the heron, and birds in flight are great.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Breathtaking, she certainly is :) So glad you enjoyed her photos.

      Delete
  8. Riitta, I forgot to thank you for your visit.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are very welcome, happy to be visiting your blog again :)

      Delete
  9. Wonderful photos. I'm always confident that Eileen will be able to set me straight on the types/names of birds!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Ellen, I am always very grateful to blogging friends like Eileen who help with IDs. I am always learning :)

      Delete
  10. Replies
    1. Thank you Margaret, happy you enjoyed them :)

      Delete
  11. Denise, the difference between the swans reminded me of differences between the snowy and great egrets we often saw when living in VA. The snowy egret was smaller with orange feet and the great egret was much larger with black. And, there were also cattle egret, which were even smaller. The diversity in wildlife is always so interesting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Dorothy, that sounds really nice that you got to see them when living down in your area. I agree, they are always so interesting.

      Delete

I thank you for taking the time to leave a comment. I enjoy reading them very much and always try to return a visit. As I do monitor comments it may take a while for them to appear, even quite late depending on what is going on and how much time I am able to spend on the computer.

I appreciate all who look at my blog, but I am unable to publish businesses or anonymous visitors.