Tuesday, May 25, 2021

OUR SON'S CICADA PHOTOS

I am sharing our Son's cicadas.  It has been determined by his parents (us of course), that he and our Daughter-in-law definitely have more in their area than we do around our home.  

(These are ones where all you see are their molted outer shell.)

We have a few in comparison but I suppose it's early days yet.  If I sound disappointed I am not.  We have trees in our yard but their home backs onto a wood.  We exchange photos via text from our trips out, even around our garden if something of interest comes up.  They enjoy walking each day and have their own interest with things in nature.  I am very happy about that.


Interesting facts about Cicadas according to this website, is that "periodical cicadas - the ones with 13 or 17 year cycles, first made an appearance in scientific literature about 300 years ago.  These cicadas are distinct from the ones that make an appearance every summer.  The periodical cicadas remain juveniles for more than a decade, until hormones kick in and turn them into adults." 

They continue to say that "there are several 'broods' or groups of these cicadas across the eastern United States.  Each brood emerges in the same year and in approximately the same geographical area - sometimes a small area, and sometimes a larger one.

Biologists have been closely following the cicadas  for centuries, and in that time have uncovered some interesting things about these insects.


Periodical cicadas only live in one area worldwide: in the United States, in areas east of the Great Plains.  These species moved there after the last glaciers began leaving the area some 18,000 years ago.  The ice would have been inhospitable to the cicadas beforehand.  You can read much more about them here.

According to the link here, cicadas live on all continents except Antarctica, and they thrive in warm environments - especially the tropics.  Therefore you will find them in Latin America, Australia, Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific, and South Africa hot spots.  There are more than 170 described species throughout the U.S. and Canada, and the U.S. alone is home to 15 groups (broods) of cicadas with varying life cycles.


An annual cicadas can live between two and fives years, and a periodical cicadas can live for up to 17 years in the larva stage.  That's not quite as long as queen termites which are thought to live 50 to 100 years, but it's far more impressive than the average life span of a housefly which is 15 to 30 days.  Cicadas, like most insects, live the majority of their lives in the immature stages of development.  While some can remain underground for more than a decade, they typically die only a few weeks into adulthood.

(In the above collage you will see they are in various stages of molting.  The ones on the bottom 2nd from left and first on the right, have shed.  Once their skins harden their colors change like you see in the other photos.)

Another website of interesting facts can be found here, and another here.

That's all from my Son's cicadas photos.  But I'll end up with one more photo and a video of his.  The first are wildflowers, Philadelphia fleabane.  I will share it again sometime and add more information...

and this video.  He was walking along the path and came across a deer.



You can click on the link below to take you to more fascinating photos.  It really is a fascinating phenomenon.


All for now!  Hope you have enjoyed.  I know they are not everyone's cup of tea, but this has been quite an experience for us and as I always do, I enjoyed learning about them. 




30 comments:

  1. His pictures are really good. I had no idea that they live this long.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Ginny, I appreciated my Son letting me share these great photos, and very interested in what I found out :)

      Delete
  2. Very interesting and I looked it up and they are here in some parts of Australia.
    The Deer is lovely.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Margaret, I will have to look up the Australian cicadas :)

      Delete
  3. Beautiful things. It is too long since I have seen or heard a cicada.

    ReplyDelete
  4. They are a lovely insect. I like the colours of these. we have them here too. Some summers they are deafening. When we were kids we would wear them like broaches and go into school with them. Then squeeze them a little to make them chirp.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They sure are Diane :) That's an interesting childhood memory.

      Delete
  5. Fabulous photos and interesting information. Have a good day, Diane

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Diane, a good day to you also :)

      Delete
  6. They are so interesting but I'm sure glad I'm not in their path!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Martha, I can understand your sentiment :)

      Delete
  7. Replies
    1. Muito obrigado :) Um abraço e uma boa semana contínua para vocês também.

      Delete
  8. Absolutely fantastic photography skills to get such clear perfect photos of these cicadas and I can count every little baby red eye and little hair on their heads. I think I might die of Joy if I got that close to a deer and I would never let my hand hold a cicada crawling around like that it's making me feel creepy just watching it. Thanks for sharing all this these are really good the videos and the photos

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are very welcome and thank you Sandra, our son takes great photos and videos. I am always happy when a new one comes through :)

      Delete
  9. Where I was brought up thee were cicadas and where I live now there are no cicadas. I really miss their evening clatter.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can understand missing these sounds Red :)

      Delete
  10. Beautiful photos from your son, nice to learn more of these cicadas.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Christine, I had fun learning also :)

      Delete
  11. They are huge, aren't they? We're yet to see them. I can't decide if I hope they don't show or anticipating it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know what you mean Jeanie :) Yes they are huge! The squirrels and birds are doing their part. My bird feeders have been awfully quiet and it took couple of days for the penny dropped and I realized what was on their menu!!!

      Delete
  12. I think cicadas are fascinating Denise although we've never really had to deal with them in our own "backyard". So I really appreciate your son's pictures and your clear explanations. And the links. thank you for this all.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I enjoyed your son's photos and videos very much, Denise. Cicadas are so interesting! We have not seen them here yet, but have been warned the 17 year periodic ones might be on the way. We'll see, but I must say they certainly are making their entrance at your sons.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Martha Ellen, they certainly are. I hope they pass you by :)

      Delete
  14. I heard them today. They sounded like they were in the yard across the street.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That sound is amazing, I hear them now. Thanks Linda :)

      Delete

I thank you for taking the time to leave a comment. I enjoy reading them very much and always try to return a visit. As I do monitor comments it may take a while for them to appear, even quite late depending on what is going on and how much time I am able to spend on the computer.

I appreciate all who look at my blog, but I am unable to publish businesses or anonymous visitors.