Thursday, June 10, 2021

WALNEY POND - PART 1

When we first arrived there were two Canada Geese swimming among the lily pads.  
I didn't see a nest and they seemed well-content and calm, not worried about us or the other visitors.
On first look it is hard to tell the difference between a male and female Canada Goose, but I found out how at this website, and also lots of interesting information at the Beauty of Birds.  The females have pointed tails, while males possess rounded tails. Sub-adults have rounded tails too but a notch is usually present that can distinguish them from mature males.  Additionally, males have larger, wider head crowns than females.
The term "sub-adult" describes a plumage that occurs after the juvenile (1st-year) plumage but before the adult plumage.  (Birds that take several years to acquire their adult plumage such as eagles, Swainson's Hawks, White-tailed Hawks and several others, have one or a few sub-adult plumages.)
Gregg found the other bird, a female Red-winged Blackbird.  I saw her mate on the other side of the pond.  It flew into a tree nearby.  Their trill is very distinctive.  I am no expert but once I hear it I know its identity immediately.  
She was very cooperative while Gregg took her photos.
The oldest recorded Red-winged blackbird was 15 years, 9 months old.  
It was banded in New Jersey in 1967, and found alive but injured in Michigan in 1983.  It was able to be released after recovering from its injuries.
Red-winged blackbirds roost in flocks in all months of the year.  In summer small numbers they roost in the wetlands where the birds breed.  Winter flocks can be congregations of several million birds, including other blackbird species and starlings.  Each morning the roosts spread out, traveling as far as 50 miles to feed, then re-forming at night.
This cute Red-eared slider swam up to us when we were standing on the overlook.  I suspect it was hoping for a morsel or two, but we have a rule about not feeding wildlife.  We have never come across a desperate case and if that ever happened  we would call a wildlife center to get help.
Our shadows can be seen here at that same overlook.
Red-eared sliders are native to the Southern United States and northern Mexico, but are now inhabiting other places because of pet releases.  I see them in almost every pond I have ever visited.  Sadly, and through no fault of its own,  this poor creature is considered an invasive species.
The Red-eared slider gets its name from the small, red stripe around its ears, or where its ears would be, and from its ability to slide quickly off rocks and logs into the water.  I have often watched them slip back into the water as we approach when walking along one of our favorite walking paths.  
Water-lilies are slowly covering the pond.  
We are looking forward to coming back to see them blooming.
Last photo of one of the geese taking off, and its mate wasn't far behind.
 As I usually do, I have more photos to share from Walney Pond.  Next time there will be wildflowers.

Thanks for looking and enjoy your day.




32 comments:

  1. I've never seen so many lily pads in one place! And I had no idea about the Canada Geese tails! We have a lot here, so this info will come in so handy. And who knew how long those blackbirds live, that is amazing!

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    1. Thank you Ginny, I enjoyed finding out these facts for my post. I will be paying more attention too whenever I come across the Canada Goose.

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  2. What a beautiful post - from beginning to end.
    Thank you.

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  3. Beautiful photos Denise. Love water lilies and always good to see.

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    1. Hi Margaret, thank you, so glad you enjoyed :)

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  4. Que maravilha, fotografias de uma grande beleza.
    Um abraço e continuação de uma boa semana.

    Andarilhar
    Dedais de Francisco e Idalisa
    Livros-Autografados

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    1. Muito obrigado :) Um abraço e continuação de boa semana.

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  5. Hello Denise
    Pretty shots of the pond and geese. I did not know there was a difference between the male and female geese. I will pay more attention next time I see them. I love the cute turtle and the waterlilies. Take care, enjoy your day!

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    1. Hello Eileen, thank you! You take care and enjoy your day also :)

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  6. that seems to be a long life for a bird. i did not know they can live that long. i like the turtle with his nose out of the water and ringlets of water around it...

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  7. Lovely photos, interesting question regarding the sex of the geese.

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    1. Thank you Christine, happy you find it interesting :)

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  8. marvelous trip to the pond - love all the photos and info - sad that the slider is considered invasive - I have a thing for turtles

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    1. Yes I agree Carol, it is very sad. I have my own thing with turtles :) and always enjoy seeing them.

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  9. The slider underwater makes for interesting almost mystical photos, especially in the one where it seems it is about to swirl down a drain to some other realm. :)

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    1. I like how you describe the slider Penelope :) and thank you.

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  10. Beautiful captures Denise! That's a shame about the turtles. People releasing pets in the wild causes so many problems.

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  11. Fabulous shots of the pond and geese, Denise.

    Love, love, love the cute turtle and waterlilies.

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  12. what a lovely pond. Even with my bird book I have trouble identifying different species. You're very good at that1

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    1. Thank you Jeanie, I still have a lot to learn :)

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  13. what a great spot...such a great shot of the turtle!!

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    1. Thank you Debbie, when they are not startled where they quickly slip into the water, they seem to hang around long enough for a few photos :)

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