Friday, October 5, 2018

FRYING PAN PARK



Our latest walk took us to Frying Pan Park.  We haven't been here for three years or more.  


One of the attractions of the park is Kidwell Farm, a working demonstration farm.  It recreates farming life that would have taken place in the 1930's and has many animals.  These include cows, horses, sheep, goats, chickens and a few more.  As you can see I was particularly taken with the new calf. 
It is free to get in so there are always families, a great place to bring small children.  There is an admission charge for special events. 


As well as the farm there is also the Frying Pan Meetinghouse which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places dating from the 18th century, and the Old Floris Schoolhouse, constructed in 1911.


No one really knows how the name Frying Pan came about, because the already named road was here before predated records, or so the story goes.  I got the following from the article found here.



One story is that when people camped by the water, in haste to leave the next morning they left their frying pan behind.  Depending on the time frame, these people could have been American soldiers from the War of 1812, copper miners from 1728 or native Americans before that.  Another theory comes from its geography. The 'run' (small stream) emptying into a round pool, suggested the name but its not clear which pool this story references.

The name Frying Pan is first seen in Virginia records in a 1728 deed from Lord Fairfax himself, when a man named Robert 'King' Carter bought the land to build a copper mine.


In 1892 the community petitioned the postal service to change its name.  They were sent several names to choose from and they selected "Floris".  I have only ever know this area to be called Frying Pan, and didn't know the name Floris until I read up on its history.

I will have more photos to share from Kidwell Farm another day.
Thank you for looking and also to those who are able to leave a comment, I appreciate it very much.  Wishing you all a great weekend. 



28 comments:

  1. A working farm strikes me as a much better use of the land than a mine.
    And that calf is a charmer.

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  2. Hello, looks like my kind of place. I love all the farm animals. Great photos. Enjoy your day and weekend.

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    1. It was great being around them. Thank you Eileen and the same to you.

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  3. You make a great historian, Denise, and an interesting one. I liked the picture of the children with the hen.

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    1. That's a nice compliment Valerie, I do enjoy finding out about these places. The fun of going to them is researching afterwards.

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  4. I just showed the post to Bob and we both oooohhh and awed and love this post. bring on the rest of the photos. I would have snapped myself silly in this beautiful place from the past.

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    1. So happy you enjoyed it Sandra, you and Bob. And yes I did snap myself silly :)))

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  5. Good that it is free, very educational for the children. Lovely photos. Take care Diane

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    1. Very good, great for families of any size. Thanks Diane and you take care too.

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  6. Looks like a wonderful park, and what a name!

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    1. Fascinating names over here, I always wonder how they originated. Thanks Christine :)

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  7. Love animals! Love farm animals. The cows were so cute.

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  8. What a neat place! Love the pictures of the new Calf.

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    1. Yes I agree, I kept taking photos of the new calf. There was another in the field but he was a bit too far away for a decent photo.

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  9. It is a good way to get city kids to appreciate a rural way of life, places like this.

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    1. It is indeed, a great way to be introduced to how hard our farming families work.

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  10. Wonderful pictures, and an unusual story! I think my favorites are of the little calf. He is so sweet! And look at his long white eyelashes!

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    1. Thank you Ginny, my favorite too :) And those eyelashes!!!

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  11. Denise, Frying Pan Park provides a great experience. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. You are very welcome Doug, I'm glad you enjoyed my post.

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  12. Thanks for sharing about this place. And stunning photos!

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    1. Thank you Nasreen, so happy you enjoyed Frying Pan Park.

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  13. That is a really fun way to learn some fascinating history ... and always fun to see the animals, especially that baby calf -- those eyes!!

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    1. Yes Sallie, learning and not realizing you're learning while having so much fun. Thanks so much!

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