Thursday, September 19, 2019

FLOWERS AT WILLIAMSBURG BOTANICAL GARDEN

The third and last post from the garden and our first flower here is a Sulfur Cosmos.   There will be a link in red lettering, describing what that flower is.  This one is native to Mexico, Central America and northern South America.
The next several photos are of Rose Mallow, also known as the Rose of Sharon, Syrian ketmia, Shrub althea or Korean rose.  They had many happy bees and butterflies visiting, other flyers also.
Other names, the Swamp Mallow, Marsh Mallow and Marsh Hibiscus.  
Swamp hibiscus plants are water-loving plants and they will stop blooming in dry soil.  However, the plant, which dies and enters a dormant period in winter, should not be watered until it displays new growth in spring.  Once the plant is actively growing, it needs a deep watering two or three times per week during warm weather.
At this link I read "You will often read that the marshmallow plant (Althaea officinalis) was once used to make marshmallows." and then it gives more information.  There is also a recipe on how to make marshmallows from marshmallow root.

I have only seen the white blooms growing wild, and pink grown in other gardens, but I have never seen the lavender.   They were beautiful!

This is a Rose Mallow leaf well chewed on but thought it made an interesting photo.
Always on the look-out for an interesting story, I found the following here.

"Lady Jean Skipwith, a contemporary and friend of the great botanical record keeper Thomas Jefferson, wrote of her cultivation of the swamp-rose mallow, which would have grown in the swampy areas of Southern Virginia where Skipwith lived and practiced horticulture.  To this day, the swamp-rose mallow can be found along the banks of brackish and salt marshes and wetlands, preferring consistently moist soil and partial-to-full sun.  Its territory extends from Texas throughout the Southeast United States and North to Ontario.  A confection made since ancient times from the boiled roots of its cousin, Althaea officinalis, in Europe and Northern Africa, has evolved into our modern marshmallow." 
This lovely plant is called a Panicled Hydrangea, also known as Peegees Hydrangeas or Dwarf Hydrangea.  
It is native to Japan and China, and is one of the more cold-hardy species of hydrangeas, and even a harsh winter does not stop it from flowering.  The blooms are large and greenish-white in color, which age to a "vintage pink" when the temperatures drop.
Next we have the Woodland Sunflower.  Its other names are Divergent sunflower, Rough sunflower, and Rough Woodland Sunflower.  It is native to central and eastern North America, from Ontario and Quebec in the north, south to Florida and Louisiana, and west to Oklahoma and Iowa. 
Marigolds, such a bright and cheerful flower.

That's about it for now on our visit here.  I hope you have enjoyed the posts from Williamsburg Botanical Garden.






38 comments:

  1. Stunning, unique, interesting. I love this. Now I want some marshmallows. The lavender ones are gorgeous. We have some flowers around here that look just like some of these, I wonder if they are marshmallows...

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    1. Thank you Ginny, I want some too :) I wonder if they are marshmallows? If you find out let me know :)

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  2. What an absolutely glorious garden. Many, many thanks.

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    1. Obrigado e desejo-lhe um final de semana muito feliz :)

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  4. Amazing flowers, you captured every detail so beautifully!☺

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    1. Thank you Natalia, so happy you enjoyed them :)

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  5. How I wish that garden was mine, complete with a gardener of course.

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  6. Hello Denise, lovely variety of flowers. They are all beautiful. Enjoy your day, wishing you a happy weekend ahead.

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  7. Lots of fine detail in this post.

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  8. We used to have a rose of Sharon in you yard when I was growing up. Mom said she planted it just for me!

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    1. How lovely, a sweet connection. Thanks for that share Sharon :)

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  9. Hi Denise,
    Wonderful set of flower images, what a superb garden.
    The chewed leaf is interesting, must have been a large caterpillar.
    All the best,
    John

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    1. Hi John, I would think so too. All the best and have a wonderful weekend :)

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  10. I did enjoy your posts on the Williamsburg Botanical Garden, Denise! The plants are lovely and your information on them is great. Lady Jean Skipwith has my attention. I must read more about her. It's all very interesting--thank you for the links.

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    1. So glad Martha Ellen, and you are very welcome :)

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  11. Interesting read about the flowers. Your pictures of them are clear and crisp. I have all planted in my yard. The Swamp Hibiscus I have moved from two houses. It's a hardy and fast growing plant. Mine bloomed and survived the hot summer well. The flowers are as big as a paper plate. Virginia does have some beautiful plants that thrive well.

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    1. Hi Betsy, happy you enjoyed. I know you have a real pretty garden. You're right about the plants here in Virginia. I need some of those hardy ones :)

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  12. Beautiful, Denise. I see the white and pink swamp hibiscus, and more often the pink. But like you, I have never seen the lavender. They are all beautiful.

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    1. Hi Rose, thank you. It is interesting about that lavender color and they sure were beautiful!

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  13. That was wonderful how you gave us that rundown of each of the flowers, plus lovely photographs :D) xx

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    1. Hi Sue, I'm glad you enjoyed the ID's. I do my best finding them if I don't know them myself and I always love getting more information :)

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  14. Beautiful flowers in those gardens. I especially love the cosmos and the pretty woodland sunflower.

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    1. Hi Linda, yes those two are gorgeous flowers aren't they? :)

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  15. Flowers are a sweet gift to us from our creator. Love seeing these. :)

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  16. So nice to see these colourful blooms :)

    All the best Jan

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  17. Had no idea about the history of the marshmallow ...although it makes perfect sense once I read your explanation! I love the Rose of Sharon flowers.

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    1. Hi Sallie, I had read the marshmallow history once before but many years ago. I hadn't thought of it since until I started finding out about each flower photo I have taken. I love the flower and its name.

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