Friday, July 13, 2018

BUTTERFLIES AT THE SMITHSONIAN NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM, WASHINGTON DC

Thank you for visiting and leaving comments.  I have been getting ready for company this weekend, and will be slow getting back to you, but I will catch up eventually.

This is an Atlas Moth.  They were in a mesh box protected from the public.  The reason was that they sleep during the day and are awake at night.

I have tried very hard to identify this type of long-wing but have had no success.

A few weeks ago we met up with out-of-town family in Washington DC.  They wanted to go to the Smithsonian Natural History Museum.  There is a small, enclosed butterfly garden in there.  I took photos and identified what I could.  If I was unsure I just left it.  Please feel free to ID them if you can, or even correct any you think I may have gotten wrong.
I could not find any ID on the butterfly above, and below I am not sure about the one on the left, but on the right is a Japanese Paper Kite.

Once again I tried hard but could not find an ID.




Above and below could not find an ID.

This one is called a Malachite.





 Lovely markings on this Leopard Lacewing Butterfly.

 Gregg had a Common Long-wing land on the back of his collar. 


 Another landed on the bottom of his shirt, a Blue Morpho. The butterflies were landing on a lot of people that day.
Here is another with less tattered wings.  A bit blurry but it gives you an idea of its pretty design. It would have been hard to take a larger camera into this small enclosure and it was crowded.  All these photos were taken with my cell phone.

Have a great weekend everyone!





32 comments:

  1. Your photos are so good, hard to believe you took them with your phone! All the butterflies are gorgeous, and I would rather see them than know their names. The Atlas moths are huge! I saw a T.V. show about them once. They do not have a mouth! They do not eat, they only live to reproduce, then they die. They are the largest moth there is, and only live for a week or two.

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    1. Thank you Ginny :) That is very interesting about the Atlas Moth. Thanks for sharing, always love learning about these things.

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  2. I adore butterflies and moths. Ephemeral magic. Thank you so much and enjoy your company.

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  3. Could you arrange a shipment of pretties to my garden, please? All I ever see are those uninteresting white butterflies and an unidentifiable red.

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    1. Heading your way Valerie :) If only I could :)))

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  4. Love the photos with such great details of beautiful butterflies and moths!

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  5. to me butterflies are like flying flowers, and your photos are just gorgeous of each of these and there are many I have never seen before.. super shots for sure.... I agree with ginny about the phone pics are amazing

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    1. Thank you Sandra , they always make me happy to be around them. These phones get better and better for taking photos.

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  6. WOW, gorgeous butterflies and photos. The moth is amazing. Enjoy your day and weekend!

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  7. I also find ID of insects very difficult. All the dragon and damsel flies I took last week are making my life impossible!
    Love this post though, beautiful photos Diane

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    1. Thank you Diane, I am happy you enjoyed it. ID’ing things can get frustrating at times.

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  8. I did not expect to see living creatures at the museum. These are truly beautiful! I think the one after the Tiger is a Julia longwing/heliconian.

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    1. Thank you Kenneth, I appreciate the help with the ID :) The Museum has a lot more interesting insects on display. I always enjoy them.

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  9. Hi Denise,
    A real wow for this post with the butterflies, the Blue Glassy Tiger is a real beauty, unfortunately I cannot help with the ID as I'm sure we see none of these in England.
    Also the Atlas Moth is a super image.
    Super post,
    All the best, John

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    1. Hi John, a lot of these butterflies we don’t get in the States, but we often see international ones in butterfly gardens. Thank you and enjoy the rest of your weekend.

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  10. Even without all the IDs this was a very colorful post, Denise. I used to spend hours taking photos of the butterflies in our VA back yard so really appreciated seeing these. Enjoy your weekend and company.

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    1. Thank you Dorothy, so glad you enjoyed them.

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  11. So gorgeous. Imagine if we dressed like butterflies!

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    1. We would be very colorful wouldn’t we? :)

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  12. Those are all so colorful and pretty. Not seen a lot around my parts out in the yard this yr. Not many bees and butterflies...but if you need ants I have my share and a few more folks share! I think they are planning on taking over the world. Great pics. Thanks for stopping by and leaving comments while I havde been out and about and enjoying life.

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    1. Hi Pam, I have my share of ants too :)

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  13. beautiful captures, i was not aware of this butterfly garden!!!

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    1. Hi Debbie, it is a small, almost tubular temporary room.

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