Friday, August 31, 2018

GREEN SPRING GARDENS


This is a continuation of a visit to Green Spring Gardens, when we went to find the ponds we had just learned about.  If you missed the Great Blue Heron catching his huge fish, you can see it here
If you are in the area and would like to visit, when you enter the parking lot I would suggest you park your car as far to the left as you can.  You will walk down a hill to the left.  In fact, there is a sign pointing you in the right direction.
You can read more information at this link. The photo below shows you the Springhouse Cottage.
Just across the narrow road is a four-chamber structure that is extremely old.  They certainly don't want you going closer and hurting yourself.  An iron fence surrounds it, preventing the curious from further exploration.
If you go to this link you will learn more.
Finally we sighted the first pond. It was really beautiful. Overlooking them are Sycamores and Pines. At this time of day we felt the natural light was super, earlier would have been even better.  A good reason not to go when the sun is glaring right overhead.  We keep having to tell ourselves this.
Here you can see the gazebo. We sat there for a while, chatted and took in the pretty scenery.  
This lovely lantana bush was blooming right next to the gazebo.
There is a pathway that goes through a wooded area and I came across a familiar wildflower, the Jewelweed.  Its scientific name is Impatiens capensis.  You can learn more about it at this link.
As best as I could identify, the following plant is called Ironweed, scientific name Vernonia fasciculata.  There is a website here for more info.
It is a member of the aster family.
I am not an expert at identifying flowers but try my best.  If you think I am incorrect please let me know.  I welcome all the help I can get.
Everywhere is very lush and green, with lots of wildflowers along our walk.  I found the Cardinal flower.  Its scientific name is Lobelia cardinalis L, link here
In the photo below you can see the Blue Cardinal flower, scientific name Lobelia siphilitica. I have never noticed this one before and it is new to me.
There are many wildflower websites online as you can imagine, but one of my favorites is at the US Wildflower's Database here.
We came across a tree where people had carved out their initials into the trunk.  I felt a twinge when I saw this.  I guess you could call me a tree hugger.  I think a much nicer way to show how much you love someone is to go and plant one somewhere and watch it grow, along with your relationship.  What say you or am I just an old fuddy-duddy?  Probably!  However, there is an interesting article on tree carvings here.
There were benches in all the right places.  This one was at the top of a steep hill in the shade of those beautiful trees. 

I enjoyed looking at the Black-eyed Susan's (Rudbeckia hirta).  They were everywhere and the hoverflies seemed to enjoy them.  Not that clear a photo below but at least I can see what it looks like.  They look like a bee but have only one set of wings, and they cannot sting.
I always seem to have a lot of photos whenever we go out, but I'll share more another time.

It looks like we are going to be in for thunder storms over the next several days.  The gardens will love it.  

The first day of September today, wow!  

Thank you for stopping by and enjoy your day.




24 comments:

  1. I cannot BELIEVE it!! You and I both posted the Jewelweed today!!! I love it when you post lots of pictures of your trips, because I want to see everything! You got a great reflection of the pretty gazebo! And the Cardinal flowers are so unusual and amazing! I don't think I have ever seen one. The Hoverfly is a bee impostor! Either way, I would not come very close. But he does match the flower very well. What a beautiful effect under the tree! What is it, spots of sun shining through?

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    1. Isn't that a great coincidence. I have already been to your blog and enjoyed your photos. To answer your question that's the sunlight shining on the leaves and leaving their shadows. Nature has some really beautiful effects doesn't it? Thanks Ginny and have a great weekend :)

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  2. On carving initials into trees? You may be a fuddy duddy - but you are in good company.
    Beautiful gardens.

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  3. Lovely photos! I haven't been there in ages, perhaps 20 years.

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    1. Thanks Linda, I'm glad we discovered this garden. We rotate between the others now.

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  4. Fortunately, carving on bark doesn't hurt the tree. That's the only thing that stopped my anger when I first saw carvings. Keep on taking pictures, Denise, I love to see them.

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  5. you know how I love black eyed susans. that gazebo is the perfect place to rest and enjoy..so much beauty in one place... the lantana is gorgeous as is the view with it. I like those stone ruins and am glad to see they put safety rail on top of the black wrought iron fence. when I see that type of fence I always think how dangerous they are with those spikes. this way they are safer

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    1. Hi Sandra, from one who loves seeing your photos of your own black eyed susans :) Thank you and I feel uneasy around those spikes also, am glad for the safety rail.

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  6. That's a beautiful place to spend a day...peaceful.

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    1. It was and I am looking forward to going back again. Thanks Red!

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  7. Beautiful shots! That gazebo has particular appeal.

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  8. Your heron eating fish now lives in my mind! I was JUST thinking of that shot again before I came here! These wonderful shots should be a slideshow.... Well done, D

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    1. Glad you enjoyed them, and thank you Cloudia :)

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  9. Beautiful photos of a lovely place. Thanks for sharing. Happy weekend Diane

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  10. oh this garden is just beautiful -- and thank you for the link to your amazing blue heron "lunch" post -- I always enjoy seeing wading birds catching and eating their meal -- and this was one of the best series I've ever seen of that behavior. I'm catching up and enjoyed all the posts I missed.

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    1. Thank you Sallie, and you are very welcome. So glad you enjoyed this and the heron's lunch post :)

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