Friday, April 19, 2019

LAST OF THE MEADOWLARK GARDENS PHOTOS, TIL NEXT TIME

If you go here you will be able to read the history of Meadowlark Gardens.  Below my post today is the label you can click on - Meadowlark_Gardens_Vienna_VA - that will show you the others I shared, not only on this particular visit but on others throughout the lifetime of this blog.  
The marker near the flowers above identified them as Contorted Quince.
Below a Star Magnolia and Glory of the Snow
Daffodils and Primula
Daffodils and Anemones
Crocus
Below left to right: Winter Hazel, Flowering Quince and Dutchman's Breeches.
A closer look at Winter Hazel.
This is one of my favorite parts of the walk.  Okay I have many favorites, but I love this area among the trees.  
Next is the old springhouse and we pass it towards the end of our walk, the way we go anyhow, always taking a clockwise route from the visitor center.  


Part of the inscription reads as follows: in the old days springhouses did the job of refrigerators.  This springhouse served the occupants of the farm from the 18th through the early 20th centuries.  

It was built directly over the spring and shaded by trees.  Cool spring water flowing into the structure was channeled through troughs of different depths before flowing out the other side.  Whitewashing inside and out sealed the loosely mortared, thick stone walls, and provided a clean surface on the interior.  Barred vents in the side walls allowed fresh air to circulate and keep out freeloading animals.


Even in the summer, dairy goods, fresh produce and other perishables could last several days in watertight containers partially submerged in the troughs.  Less perishable foods such as salted or smoked meat, pickles, cider and wine, were stored up in the loft space and on shelves built into the walls.  The spring also provided water for drinking and washing for the house, located to the north, up the hill and behind the barn.
When Gardiner Means and Caroline Ware installed electricity in the 1930s, they pumped spring water up to the house.  A refrigerator and sink replaced most of the functions of the springhouse.  The springhouse ruins were stabilized in 1996. 
We are back at the visitor center now.  Below you will see more photos taken around the garden.   
 And now a painting by one of the many talented local artists.  There are several others.  The visitor center is also a wonderful art gallery and they are all for sale.
 I say goodbye to Sunshine and tell him I'll stop by next time.
We are outside now and heading back to the car.  It's been a great walk.  I am looking forward to seeing what other flowers will be growing the next time we go.  Time in the garden among all these beautiful spring blooms has been very uplifting.
Thanks so much for following me along to Meadowlark Gardens, and I hope your day is a great one.



30 comments:

  1. I just love them all. And this painting, I can almost see the texture on it. I did not know any of this information about springhouses. It was very interesting, and I loved learning about it!

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  2. It is SUCH a beautiful place. Thank you (again) for sharing the wonder.

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  3. I've enjoyed the walk, Denise in Meadowlark Gardens. It's a beautiful place with a lovely name. So much of interest to see in the grounds and visitor centre. Thank you for the information about springhouses. It's good that what's left of the old stone building was retained to remind visitors of its function and what went on in the olden days.

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    1. Happy you enjoyed it and I know there will be future trips and blog posts as the year goes along :)

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  4. Quince! That's it! Thanks, Denise, I have been trying to remember the name of that shrub. It's a lovely place to visit and I particularly liked your photos of the daffodils, one of my very favourite flowers.

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    1. Glad I was able to help with the name Valerie. Spring is my favorite time of the year when everything starts to bloom :)

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  5. Think I mentioned before that I would love to walk there with you and also to say hello to Sunshine. Happy Easter Diane

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    1. Would love to walk there with you too Diane. Had a lovely Easter thank you and I hope you did too.

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  6. Hello, beautiful collection of flowers. The artwork is lovely too. It looks like an awesome place for a walk. Wishing you and yours a very happy and blessed Easter weekend!

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    1. Thank you Eileen, glad you enjoyed everything I shared today.

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  7. the perfect post for Easter week end, gorgeous flowers and the stones are so beautiful, both have beautiful meanings also.. LOVE that lizard

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    1. Thank you Sandra and I know I have a fellow lizard lover in you :)

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  8. Interesting the technology used to keep food. We also used a dug out of sorts but packed it with ice that kept things cool most of the summer. We didn't have spring water.

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    1. That's interesting Red, I remember my nan having a pantry/cellar that was very cool. All her perishables were in there.

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  9. Uplifting indeed! Thank you D <3

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    1. You are very welcome Cloudia, glad you enjoyed :)

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  10. Hi Denise,
    Very interesting to see the Springhouse and the way it was worked. When I was a youngster the village I lived in had the big house and they in the grounds had an Ice House which was basically a deep hole with a curved brick cover that in the Winter had ice thrown in and being deep stayed frozen all Summer and kept meat etc fresh for weeks.
    Super set of images of the Spring flowers.
    All the best, John

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    1. Hi John, very interesting about your village. Thank you for sharing that. Thank you and happy Spring :)

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  11. Denise, I've really enjoyed all that you have shared in this lovely park. The flowers are so lovely. Your photos are beautiful. My husband's grandparents had a springhouse on their farm. It's so interesting the ingenuity that folks had before electricity. Thank you for sharing your lovely walk. I really enjoyed it! Have a lovely Easter.

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    1. So glad Martha Ellen and thank you :) How interesting about your husband's grandparents. Glad to share my own post and hope you had a wonderful Easter :)

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  12. Those flowers are beautiful. I love the great variety of species and colors. My relatives in Idaho who lived on a ranch had refrigerators and freezers but kept their springhouse going for beverages and such. It was always special and ice cold.
    Have a great Easter weekend.

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    1. Thank you Yogi, interesting about your relatives too. Necessity is the mother of invention :)

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  13. A wonderful series of posts from these beautiful gardens.
    Happy Easter Weekend.

    All the best Jan

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  14. Enjoyed the walk, Denise, even if I didn’t have the benefit of the exercise, Happy 🐰 Easter to you and Gregg

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    1. Hi Dorothy, thank you and hope yours was a great one :)

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  15. Replies
    1. Thanks William, I had not seen one before either until this place.

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